Data Analysis to address, "Does YCUSD have a problem attracting and retaining teachers?"

posted Jul 20, 2016, 9:52 PM by Yuba City Teachers Association

 

Does YCUSD have a problem

attracting and retaining great teachers and other educators

 for our students, schools and community?

 

“Research consistently shows that teacher quality is one of the most important variables for student success and that teachers with stronger qualifications (academic ability, strong content knowledge, full preparation before entry, certification in the field taught, and experience) produce higher student achievement.”

 

~ Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education - Research Brief, December 2011 

 

Research has shown that teachers have the highest educational influence.  Districts must attract and retain the best educators in order to increase and improve services for pupils. Multiple research reports verify the importance of salary and working conditions as they relate to attracting and retaining the best teachers. Additionally, the research proves that the achievement gap between poor students and affluent students closes significantly with the finest teachers.

 

YCUSD has a significant, ongoing problem attracting and retaining the best teachers.

 

 Multiple vacancies continued to exist during throughout the 2015/16 school year.  Some of those positions were filled with interns and teachers with Short Term Staffing Permits (STSPs), while others were filled with long-term substitutes or simply left vacant.  

 

In 2015/16, 3.2% of the YCTA Bargaining Unit positions were filled with teachers without  complete credentials or  left completely unfilled. 

 

Fifteen classrooms filled with students did not have a fully credentialed teacher.  This does not account for short term or even long term absences of the regular classroom teacher.  These are classrooms without a credentialed teacher at all.

 

YCUSD Vacancies and Positions filled by persons

without full credentials in 2015/16

 

Interns

STSPs

Long-Term Subs

Unfilled

Number

3

6.6

5.2

9.8

Date of info.

10/28/15

10/28/15

10/28/15

10/28/15

Number

6.6

6

(YCTA was not provided with updated info. at that time)

Date of info.

3/17/16

3/17/16

   

Based upon the 15/16 Adopted Budget the YCTA Bargaining Unit was 720.82 FTEs. These vacant positions (or filled by person without full credentials) account for 3.2% of the YCTA Bargaining Unit.

 

Interns have not completed their credential program, while STSPs have made even less process in a credential program.  Long-term subs have a BA and passed the CBEST and hold only a 30 day permit to teach.

 

 

Significant Remaining and Additional Vacancies for 2016/17

 

In a May 3, 2016, email from David Bills, YCUSD Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources, 41 general education teaching positions for 2016/17 were listed as vacant, as well as an unspecified number of special education, Speech and Language Pathologists, and psychologist vacancies (more than ten). Between May 4 and June 15, 2016, 60 additional vacancies were posted by YCUSD.

 

Based upon data provided by the District on June 22, 2016, and YCUSD Board agenda actions through June 28, 2016, fewer than half of the 100+ vacancies have been filled by either internal transfers or Board action. Board action is indicated in the Board Agenda information provided by YCUSD to YCTA before each YCUSD Board meeting. YCUSD provided YCTA with a matrix of all vacancies as of June 13, and later as of June 22. The following chart shows the analysis for the June 22 data. While YCUSD indicates 27.6 FTEs, there has been no Board action to hire these candidates.

 

YCTA Bargaining Unit (BU) Positions *

Vacancy Analysis for 2016/17

Based June 2016 Data

Disposition of listed vacancy

Number

Percent of BU

Vacancies filled by internal transfers

21.99

3.1%

Vacancies filled with Board action

20

2.8%

Vacancies with named candidates

but no Board action

27.6

3.83%

Vacancies with no candidate

42.25

5.86%

TOTAL

111.84

15.5%

 

 

* Definitions:

Vacant positons were identified from excel spreadsheet provided by YCUSD on June 22, 2016.  YCTA’s contract defines vacancies. These vacancies were posted both internally and externally.

Internal transfers were identified if the person listed to fill the vacancy was an existing YCTA probationary or permanent employee.

Board action new hires were identified if the person listed to fill the vacancy was also listed as hired within the YCUSD Board agenda as provided to YCTA for each YCUSD Board meeting.

Name without Board action were identified as potential new hires if a name appeared but there was not corresponding listing on the Board agenda.

Filled positons were counted as filled if the District named either an internal transfer or a new hire as supported by YCUSD Board action (another set of documents supplied by YCUSD to YCTA). 

Still Vacant positions were counted as “still vacant” if the District named a candidate but there was no Board action or there was no named candidate at all.

Total YCTA Bargaining Unit was calculated from the FTE Summary page 12 of the 2015/16 YCUSD Adopted Budget.

 

As of June 22, the vacancies with no listed candidate were 5.9%, while those deemed vacant with either no listed candidate or no board action to accompany a named candidate were 9.7%. The number of vacancies in YCUSD is significantly higher than in surrounding districts and can be expected to get even worse as more educators retire and others take jobs in surrounding districts because of higher pay.

 

Growing Number of Resignations

 

As more positions within education have become available, the number of resignations has drastically increased. These resignations were listed in YCUSD Board meeting agendas during the fiscal year (July-June). YCUSD Board action for 2015/16 shows 56 resignations within the same time frame: 21 in the month of June with additional resignations in July. In contrast, there were only 8 resignations in June 2015, and just 6 in June 2014. (There were 16 retirements in each year, 2014/15 and 2015/16, which are not included in the resignation calculation.)

 

Resignations as per Board Action (from YCUSD Board meeting agendas)

 

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

TOTAL

‘13/14

3

10

2

2

0

0

0

3

3

3

6

6

38

‘14/15

6

11

0

2

0

0

2

3

0

2

4

8

38

‘15/16

7

6

3

1

0

0

2

2

8

3

3

21

56

 

 

The resignations for 2015/16 account for 7.8% of the YCTA Bargaining Unit. Based upon the 2015/16 Adopted Budget, the YCTA Bargaining Unit was 720.82 FTEs.

 

Teachers with a Wide Range of Experience are Leaving YCUSD

 

As other districts continue hiring and increasing incentives for more experienced teachers, notably compensation, teachers with higher levels of experience will be enticed to leave YCUSD.

The loss of experienced educators from YCUSD is already apparent and will likely grow as the teacher shortage continues. Based upon the YCTA Bargaining Unit roster provided by the District on March 3, 2016, more than 24% of the Bargaining Unit had hire dates within the last three years.  Not only is YCUSD a training ground for newer teachers who leave our district early in their careers, but it seems an increasing number of more experienced teachers are leaving as well. For our students, the long-term effects of Yuba City Unified’s failure to attract and retain teachers will linger for many years as the overall quality of the YCSUD educator work force declines.

 

Level of Experience for 2015/16 Resignations between March and June, 2016

Years of experience

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Number

5

8

2

0

1

3

1

1

2

3

2

1

1

 

Thirty teachers listed in the YCTA Bargaining Unit on March 3, 2016 resigned before the June 22, 2016 Board meeting.  Half (15 of the 30) had less than four years experience, while the other half had more than 4 years of experience.  This represents a serious talent drain from YCUSD.

 


 

 

 

 

The data provided by YCUSD makes it clear, YCUSD has a problem attracting and retaining highly qualified teachers.  YCUSD can and should use LCAP dollars to address this problem without delay, before more of our best teachers are enticed to other districts by higher salaries as well as respect for their work.  The future of our schools is in danger without great teachers in our schools. YCUSD’s failure to act and delays will continue to hurt our kids now and in the future.

Comments